The Community Of Over 578,000

Home ›› Latest Articles

Latest Articles

The Practical Workbook for Product Experience Design

Experience Design For “Targeted” User Emotion
  • Understanding what users feel when using the product is the path towards a great user experience.
  • A good starting point is to research who are the users and subsequently map their emotions at different stages of using the product.
  • Once users emotional background is figured out, it’s easier to frame problems, prevent negative emotions and build a greater user experience.

Read the full article to learn about designing great interactions that suit human emotions.

Share:Experience Design For “Targeted” User Emotion

We should never work on assumptions but we definitely should work with assumptions.

Working with assumptions
  • Although decisions in UX design shouldn’t be based on assumptions, it’s important to use generalizations to prioritize effectively.
  • An example of a useful tool based on assumptions is poker planning – a technique aimed at estimating work and avoiding anchoring to one guess.
Discussing and working with assumptions can benefit the whole team, help to set realistic expectations and mitigate the risks for further work. Read the full article to learn about how to deal with assumptions in UX design.
Share:Working with assumptions

How can we make research insights reach everyone who would actually benefit from them?

4 Ways to expand the impact of UX research across an organization

UX research is successful when results are promptly made available and actionable within the organization. Some common obstacles include tight deadlines and information fatigue. Here are four measures that might help to use UX research insights more effectively:

  1. Reflecting on which team will benefit most from the insights
  2. Delivering them in digestible formats
  3. Actively involving customer-facing departments
  4. Organizing customer feedback

Read the full article to learn about how to use these tips in your next research project.

Share:4 Ways to expand the impact of UX research across an organization

Spoiler alert: the best product design decisions are taken when analytics and feedback go hand in hand

The CX Power Couple: Why Customer Feedback and Analytics Must Both Inform Product Design

Customer feedback provides attitudinal data and analytics provides behavioral data. Both are necessary to obtain a comprehensive view of customer experience. Here are some tips on using these together to inform customer experience:

  • Be careful when asking users directly about their experience – they might find it difficult to accurately describe their behavior.
  • Keep in mind that analytics that are focused on historic data don’t provide information on why a user took a certain decision.

Read the full article to learn more about how customer feedback and analytics work together, with three clear strategies for implementing them to improve customer experience.

Share:The CX Power Couple: Why Customer Feedback and Analytics Must Both Inform Product Design
How We Listened to Our Users and Made a Better Product

Users may know their needs and problems but it can be difficult to articulate them. In this article, the author provides a brief exploration of some approaches that might be helpful.

  1. Analysing users’ behaviour and their interaction with the product.
  2. Talking to users
  3. Collecting feedback and conducting A/B testing to iterate from ideas.

Read the full article to learn how the founders at Ludwig used this approach on their product.

Share:How We Listened to Our Users and Made a Better Product
 
The Ultimate Guide to Prototyping
  • Prototyping is used to validate design assumptions and collect feedback about products before investing in product development.
  • Although wireframes and mockups resemble prototypes, they cannot be substitutes because of their inoperability.
  • Prototypes help to identify usability issues, refine user journey, make design decisions.

Read the full article for breakdown of prototyping.

Share:The Ultimate Guide to Prototyping

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Check our privacy policy and