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UX Haikus

by John Boykin
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UX Magazine contributor John Boykin shares some thoughtful musings on user experience in the form of haikus.

If you like my design, I feel good. If it works, I have succeeded.

View your baby as a service, not a product. All else will follow.

Fool tries to upsell before having sold at all. Both stones fall from hand.

One-man bands play street corners, not concert halls. Music none want to hear.

Seek neither reality from a schedule nor logic from a cat

Take excellent care of users, and the brand will take care of itself

Simplicity is a one-to-one match between an itch and a scratch

Iterate in private. Don’t learn trumpet in front of an audience.

No one has more than 80% of the answer to anything

UX seesaw: The easier for ourselves, the harder for users

Releasing garbage on time and on budget: The angels do not sing

BEEB design: There’s a Box for Everything, Everything’s in a Box

Homeopathic home page: pound of branding, molecule of info

Take excellent care of users, and the brand will take care of itself

Question everything, even the wisdom of questioning everything

Simplicity good. Consistency good. Suitability better.

Tools don’t matter. Tech don’t matter. Process don’t matter. What works matters.

Equal votes sink boats. Keep captain out of kitchen and cook off of bridge.

“Design by committee” bad. “Team consensus” good. The difference? Unknown.

Never mind what users like. Mind only what they need, want, love, and hate.

Why a “Creative Department” but no “Intelligent Department”?

Exec you please today is gone tomorrow. Users’ needs stay the same.

No process ever devised changes or overcomes human nature

“Nice to have”: Idea originated in User Experience

Big project’s exec will be quaint memory by time project goes live

No two people will organize the same material the same way

Simplicity good; ease better. Brevity good; clarity better.

You’re sitting in users’ seat at table. Treat it as theirs, not your own.

Any process that requires days of team training is a poor process

Fools seek numbers from usability testing. The wise seek insights.

Fool takes “mobile first” as “mobile only,” glibly puffed up to desktop.

Image of wooden walkway courtesy of Shutterstock.

post authorJohn Boykin

John Boykin, John Boykin answers to user experience designer, information architect, interaction designer, information designer, and UX researcher. He’s been doing all of the above for over 10 years. Clients include Walmart, Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s, Blue Shield, Bank of America, Visa, Symantec, NBC, HP, Janus, Prosper, and Mitsubishi Motors. His site, wayfind.com, will tell you more than you want to know.

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