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Design for Experience: Interactive Component of an Advertising Campaign

by UX Magazine Stuff, Design for Experience
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A closer look at the Design for Experience awards category: Interactive Component of an Advertising Campaign

“Because brands now have a presence in people’s lives beyond their initial product and service, advertising has grown exponentially more interactive and integrated over the past decade: think ChipIt! by Sherwin-Williams, Whopper Sacrifice for Burger King, or the uber-popular Nike+ FuelBand,” Jordan Clayton-Hall writes in his article “Embracing the UX Spectrum.”

The realms of advertising, software, and Internet now overlap significantly. Nearly every major advertising campaign has significant online and/or interactive components. Still, these interactive components often serve the needs of the business and its hopes for customer behavior more than they do actual customer needs and desires.

In the article, Clayton-Hall talks about a successful interactive advertising project his agency, McKinney, designed for Big Boss Brewing: an arcade game that dispenses beer to the winning player. “The beercade features ‘The Last Barfighter’ game and has cupholders in place of typical coin slots,” he writes. “Its core purpose is to advertise … but it also happens to be a product, a game, and an event.”

“Our designers had a close cultural connection to gaming arcades of the 1990s and uncovered a growing desire to recreate that experience in today’s social context of bars and beer enjoyment … They asked: How can we reinvent the social arcade experience for today’s players? How can this concept and execution tie back to the brand in a meaningful way?

The DfE Interactive Component of an Advertising Campaign award recognizes interactive components to advertising campaigns that, like “The Last Barfighter,” deliver real value, engagement, and/or utility to customers while creatively complementing the other facets of the campaign.

If you’ve encountered a particularly novel interactive element from a marketing campaign, nominate it now! If you were involved in the creation of this kind of interactive product, apply for this award.

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Image of billboard courtesy Shutterstock

post authorUX Magazine Stuff

UX Magazine Stuff, UX Magazine was created to be a central, one-stop resource for everything related to user experience. Our primary goal is to provide a steady stream of current, informative, and credible information about UX and related fields to enhance the professional and creative lives of UX practitioners and those exploring the field. Our content is driven and created by an impressive roster of experienced professionals who work in all areas of UX and cover the field from diverse angles and perspectives.

post authorDesign for Experience

Design for Experience,

The core mission of Design For Experience (DfE) is to fuel the growth, improvement, and maturation in the fields of user-centered design, technology, research, and strategy. We do this through a number of programs, but primarily through our sponsorship of UX Magazine, which connects an audience of approximately 100,000+ people to high-quality content, information, and opportunities for professional improvement.

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