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Win This Book! Design for Care: Innovating Healthcare Experience

by UX Magazine Stuff
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We’re giving away three digital copies of the new Rosenfeld Media book, Design for Care: Innovating Healthcare Experience, by Peter H. Jones.

Yesterday we gave you a sample of Peter H. Jones’ new book from Rosenfeld Media, Design for Care: Innovating Healthcare Experience.

Today, we’re launching a contest to give away three digital copies.

We’re still in the thick of our campaign to get to the bottom of what information architects do, so to enter, all you need to do is answer a question for us:

 

What does an IA do?

Just to be clear, even though our campaign is aimed specifically at information architects, for this contest we want to hear from everyone.

There are three ways to enter:

Via Twitter

  • Make sure you’re following UX Magazine on Twitter.
  • Create a tweet that says, “Hey @uxmag, <your answer>. https://uxm.ag/188 – #HeyIA @designforcare”
  • Replace the blank with your response to the question. Make sure to keep the rest of the tweet the same.
  • Publish the tweet.

Via Facebook

Via Email Subscription

Note: If, and only if, you’ve already subscribed via email, you can enter this giveaway by emailing your answer to [email protected].

Three winners will be chosen from the valid entries. The contest ends on Friday, June 28th.

post authorUX Magazine Stuff

UX Magazine Stuff, UX Magazine was created to be a central, one-stop resource for everything related to user experience. Our primary goal is to provide a steady stream of current, informative, and credible information about UX and related fields to enhance the professional and creative lives of UX practitioners and those exploring the field. Our content is driven and created by an impressive roster of experienced professionals who work in all areas of UX and cover the field from diverse angles and perspectives.

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