The Community Of Over 578,000

Home ›› Business UX Leaders ›› Enterprise UX Virtual Summit 2017

Enterprise UX Virtual Summit 2017

by Jerry Cao
Share this post on
Share on twitter
Tweet
Share on linkedin
Share
Share on facebook
Post
Share on reddit
Share
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print

Save

This online conference set a world record as the largest UX event ever! As the result of it you can watch 15 Free Webinars.

Enterprise UX Virtual Summit 2017 just wrapped up two weeks ago and now all 15 webinars are available for free.

Hosted by the enterprise collaborative design platform UXPin, the online conference set a world record as the largest UX event ever. 31,000+ people registered and 11,000+ attended across four days.

The conference focused on overcoming the challenges of designing complex B2B products in established organizations. Topics included scaling UX, creating design systems, standardizing UX process, improving enterprise usability, evangelizing design culture, overcoming legacy technology, and more.

Top practitioners and leaders shared enterprise UX best practices from recent projects. The speakers were handpicked from IBM, SAP, True Ventures, Khosla Ventures, HP Enterprise, Asana, Core Logic, and other organizations.

“We are undoubtedly in the midst of an enterprise product renaissance. A free online conference was our way of sharing the best industry lessons with folks who might otherwise miss out due to travel and cost issues.”
— Marcin Treder, CEO of UXPin

Virtual Summit Link

The 20 speakers included:

  • Irene Au – Design Partner at Khosla Ventures
  • Jeff Veen – Design Partner at True Ventures
  • Leslie Witt – Head of UX for Small Business Products at Intuit
  • Lou Rosenfeld – Information architecture legend and founder of Rosenfeld Media
  • Amanda Linden – Head of Design at Asana
  • Andrew Sandler – Director of Product Design at Groupon Merchant

You can watch all 15 sessions for free here.

post authorJerry Cao

Jerry Cao, Jerry Cao is a UX Content Strategist at UXPin, the full-stack UX design platform. He works on all the educational content and in-app content.

Share on twitter
Tweet
Share on linkedin
Share
Share on facebook
Post
Share on reddit
Share
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print

Related Articles

Building digital products for the web’s next billion users
  • Connectivity issues are further inflated by accessibility gaps. This, in turn, undermines user experience and creates obstacles for the wider use of digital products.
  • When designing for users, it’s worth considering such issues as poor connectivity, accessibility constraints, levels of technological literacy within different countries and cultural barriers.
  • In order to satisfy the needs of the next 3 billion users, it’s vital to build inclusive and accessible products that will provide solutions to the critical problems the next generation will face.
Share:Building digital products for the web’s next billion users
The Liminal Space Between Meaning and Emotion
  • To innovate well is to search for meaning behind the innovation first. This requires investing time into discovering what users need and think of unique ways to serve them and better solve their problems.
  • Emotions are widely misunderstood in UX design and often manipulation is used to predict user behavior. However, a much better approach to UX design is storyscaping, which aims at empowering users, rather than controlling them.

Read the full article to learn more about liminal space and how to apply this thinking to your design.

Share:The Liminal Space Between Meaning and Emotion

Stop frustrating your users. Invest in notification strategy instead.

The UX of Notifications | How to Master the Art of Interrupting
  • As part of UX, notifications are key to leading the user to a better interaction with the product. Therefore, notification strategy should have a central role in UX design.
  • A good starting point is to create a user’s journey map and identify major pain points. This should serve to understand when and where notifications might be of help, rather than create confusion.
  • It’s a good practice to use a variety of notifications and provide the user with opt-outs so they don’t feel overwhelmed.
Share:The UX of Notifications | How to Master the Art of Interrupting

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Check our privacy policy and