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Psychology and Human Behavior

Exploring themes in the book ‘The Chimp Paradox’ and how they connect to UX.

The Chimp Paradox: What UX Can Learn From A Book About Emotional Intelligence
  • The author shares the lessons learned from the famous mind management model called The Chimp Paradox, and how they can be applied in UX.
  • The Chimp Paradox is based on the theory that our brain is divided into three sections that receive, transmit, and react to our environment and information:
    • the chimp;
    • the human;
    • the machine.
  • In the article, the author demonstrates how these ways of perceiving information affect users’ experience and help to improve the approach to UX.
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8 min read

What if we designed anything with relationships in mind?

The Rise of Relational Design
  • The author believes that putting relationships first should be a common practice in every part of human activity.
  • The author sees a relational design as something we can anticipate in the nearest future. It can be applied in many cases – from designing cities to building any type of organization or system.
  • Relational design isn’t new in any way – the fact they are old makes them this powerful. With relationships in mind, we can start designing a new future.
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3 min read

Visualising 10 types of bias in 10 visuals.

10 Types of Cognitive Bias To Watch Out For In UX Research & Design
  • The article covers how crucial it is to address cognitive biases for navigating daily life as well as UX research and design. Our judgment and thought processes become biased, which might distort reality in accordance with our preconceived notions.
  • The author illustrates 10 examples of real-life cognitive biases and their reflection in UX research.
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5 min read

Tenets that go beyond disciplines and technical skills.

 
10 Intangibles of Design
  • The process of becoming and being a UX designer is rather complex. 
  • The article proves that the combination of some intangibles makes the difference between an average, dissatisfied designer and a successful designer.
  • Transcend disciplines and technical proficiency with these 10 intangibles of design:
    • Always be valuable.
    • Other people’s agenda matter.
    • Always bring an artifact.
    • Design requires tradeoffs.
    • Inquiry over advocacy.
    • Design like you are right, listen like you are wrong.
    • Avoid paralysis by analysis.
    • Move between abstract and concrete.
    • Your resilience will be rewarded.
    • Seek to master your craft more fully.
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11 min read
10 Intangibles of Design
To Keep a User, Sometimes You Have to Let Them Go
  • Assuming every problem is product-related drives a product-centric approach to fixing them but problems are more complex than simple fixes to content or features.
  • The author uncovers 2 ideas:
    • Not all cancels are created equal
    • Think: User-centered retention
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6 min read
To Keep a User, Sometimes You Have to Let Them Go

3 key things to keep in mind on the way to becoming an influential strategic player

When Growth Feels Like Failure
  • UX researchers tend to be people who like to see the impact of their work. However, as researchers climb their career ladders these stories often start to fall apart, causing self-doubt.
  • The authors talks about a few key things to keep in mind on the way to becoming an influential strategic player:
    1. Ripple effects are part of impact.
    2. The bigger the ship the slower the turn
    3. Ownership becomes communal
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3 min read
When-Growth-Feels-Like-Failure

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