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Win Free User Testing

by UX Magazine Stuff
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Here at UX Magazine, we’re constantly beating the drum about the importance of user testing as a critical part of improving the usability of your product or site, so we’re proud to announce that we’ve partnered with Usertesting.com to give away the following three different packages of user tests.

  • 2nd runner up – 1 Free UserTests (a $39 value)
  • 1st runner up – 3 Free UserTests (a $117 value)
  • Grand Prize – 15 Free Tests (a $585 value)

Interested? All you have to do to enter is answer the following question:

If user testing was inexpensive, what would you use it to investigate?

Via Twitter

  • Make sure you’re following UX Magazine on Twitter.
  • Create a tweet that says, “Hey @uxmag, I’d investigate [your answer]. Do I win? https://uxm.ag/mp”.
  • Replace the blank with your response to the question. Make sure to keep the rest of the tweet the same.
  • Publish the tweet.

Via Facebook

  • Make sure you’ve ‘liked’ UX Magazine on Facebook.
  • Post a message to the UX Magazine wall (not your own wall) with your response to the question.

That’s it! Now get to it. We’ll accept submissions for the next two weeks, and then review all the entries (comments and tweets) and award the following prizes to our three favorites.


If you’re not sure how exactly you might use some free user testing, here are some ideas to get you started:

Test your websites usability and effectiveness

Get a real inside view as to what website visitors really think of your websites design, navigation and usability. See what pleases or frustrates everyday users and listen to their thoughts as they talk about the best and worst features of your website. A fresh perspective can offer such long lasting and valuable insight as to bring about permanent positive change.

Test a competitor’s site

Ever wonder what your users think of the competition? Conduct Usertesting.com tests on any website, including another company’s. Then take that information and improve your own site.

Show a client how their website really works – and pinpoint where it doesn’t

Have you worked on a site that needed major changes, but you had trouble convincing the stakeholders to buy in? Run a usability test to show what impartial people think of their interface. Nothing motivates a team like watching a website visitor gets lost or frustrated.

Compare before and after

Clients often question whether a redesign is an improvement. Measure the impact with usability test videos of real people using their site before and after.

post authorUX Magazine Stuff

UX Magazine Stuff, UX Magazine was created to be a central, one-stop resource for everything related to user experience. Our primary goal is to provide a steady stream of current, informative, and credible information about UX and related fields to enhance the professional and creative lives of UX practitioners and those exploring the field. Our content is driven and created by an impressive roster of experienced professionals who work in all areas of UX and cover the field from diverse angles and perspectives.

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