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UX Magazine at SXSW – Interactive 2010

by Jonathan Anderson | UX Magazine
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We will be at the SXSW Interactive festival in Austin March 12 -16

We will be posting updates on our SXSW activities at:

https://uxmag.com/sxsw2010

UX Magazine’s Managing Editor, Jonathan Anderson, and Contributing Editor, Whitney Hess, will be on the ground looking for interesting UX stories and professionals.

We’re looking for suggestions of who we should talk to, what companies we should meet with, and what stories we should cover. There’s also an overwhelming number of exciting parties, so we’re trying to decide which ones to check out. If you have any suggestions for us, or if you’re at SXSW and see something interesting we should capture on tape or video, please send us an email:

[email protected]

For occasional updates from UX Magazine, make sure you’re following our Twitter feed @uxmag.

For more frequent on-the-ground updates, follow Jonathan (@first_day) and Whitney (@whitneyhess) on Twitter.

Jonathan will also be trying out Foursquare while at SXSW: https://foursquare.com/user/first_day

Want to contribute?

We’re going to be stretched pretty thin, so if you’re going to be at SXSW and want to help us cover the event, please email us at the above address.

post authorJonathan Anderson  |  UX Magazine

Jonathan Anderson | UX Magazine,

I am a tech-focused jack of all trades and the editor-in-chief of UX Magazine. I'm also the author of Effective UI: The Art of Building Great User Experience in Software, published by O'Reilly Media. Through its partnership with UX Magazine, I am also a senior advisor to Didus, a recruiting and career development company focused on user-centered professionals. As well, I'm engaged as the Managing Director, Product Strategy & Design for Dapperly, a fashion-oriented software product startup, and am the Principal of First Day, a small private equity and consulting company. From 2005 to 2009, I helped found EffectiveUI, a leading UX strategy, design, and development agency focused on web, desktop, and mobile systems.

I’ve been fortunate to participate in work that’s on the leading edge of user-centered strategy and design, customer experience, and software development. Everything is converging around an increased attention to the quality of user experiences, around web-enabled or web-like software, and around technologies that can create unified experiences across multiple platforms, devices, and applications. I’ve built on my experience at UX Magazine, EffectiveUI, and in writing my book to undertake a major project to find ways to make dramatic improvements to the user-centered field and to increase the perception of user-centered design, research, and technology as being core strategic values.

My work can be very hard to explain because what I do day-to-day is extremely varied since my role is usually to be a jack-of-all-trades. If I’m performing any one job function this week or month, it’s always in the broader context of fulfilling the needs of that business (whatever they might be) and in the even broader context of the private equity holding and management activities of First Day. 

My primary value has been to be an adaptable, fearless, fast-learning manager of and versatile resource to a large number of small businesses, where I hold the line in diverse functions while the companies are too small to hire specialized professionals for any given part of their business. This means I’ve had my hands in almost every aspect of starting, growing, and managing a small business, including finance, accounting, legal, management, HR, marketing/brand, PR, IT, resource management, facilities, general operations, corporate governance, project management, product development, change management, and many others.

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