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Design Our Coffee and Win This Book!

by UX Magazine Stuff
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Describe how good coffee tastes and enter to win a copy of Jon Kolko’s new book, Well Designed.

As we announced last week, we’ll be giving winners of the Design for Experience awards the chance to sip triumph in the form of an exclusive Design for Experience Private Roast coffee. Last week we also gave you an excerpt from Jon Kolko’s new book, Well Designed

We’ve got five copies of the book to give away, and we’d like to try something a little different. We’re working with a team of artisan coffee pros to put together a our DfE roast and would love to have some tasting notes to share. It would be great if our roast could in some abstract way taste like UX, so to enter the giveaway, we want you to share a coffee tasting note that you think also applies to experience design. Here’s a decent list of tasting notes to get you started, but there are really no limits. Get weird.

What’s your favorite coffee-related tasting note that also describes UX?

To give us your answer, visit our newsletter subscription page, fill out the required fields, enter your response to the contest question at the bottom of the form, and click “Subscribe to list.” If you already subscribe to our newsletter, send an email with your answer to [email protected] using the subject line: Well Designed Giveaway. Five winners will be chosen from the valid entries—contest ends on Wednesday, March 18th.

The final deadline for applications in the DfE awards has been extended to March 14. If you’ve been a part of creating a superior experience and want to get some DfE coffee in your mug, apply today!.

post authorUX Magazine Stuff

UX Magazine Stuff, UX Magazine was created to be a central, one-stop resource for everything related to user experience. Our primary goal is to provide a steady stream of current, informative, and credible information about UX and related fields to enhance the professional and creative lives of UX practitioners and those exploring the field. Our content is driven and created by an impressive roster of experienced professionals who work in all areas of UX and cover the field from diverse angles and perspectives.

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