UX Magazine

Defining and Informing the Complex Field of User Experience (UX)
Article No. 657 April 18, 2011

The Total Experience: Customers Deserve Better

Why do some companies create loyal fans while others alienate their customers? How can some organizations deliver consistently good experiences while others regularly falter?

There are a lot of reasons why some companies outperform others. But one of the underappreciated areas is customer experience (CX). Sure, companies often say they are customer-centric, but only a handful put the time and energy into becoming customer-centric. That's why it was not a huge surprise to find that only 16% of companies received "good" or "excellent" ratings in the 2011 Temkin Experience Ratings.

Overall results of Temkin Experience Ratings

The Elements Of Great Customer Experience

The Temkin Experience Ratings are based on asking 6,000 US consumers to rate their recent experience with companies along three dimensions:

  • Functional: How well did the experiences meet their needs?
  • Accessible: How easy was it for them to do what they wanted to do?
  • Emotional: How did they feel about the experiences?

The three elements of the Temkin Experience Ratings

Companies that want to be great, or even good, need to consistently interact with customers in a way that meets their customers' needs, is easily accessible, and reinforces the emotional components of the company's brand. While that may sound straightforward, it's not easy to do and requires a lot of focus from the entire company.

In general, companies were rated higher on the functional portion of the experience than they were on the accessible and emotional components. That's consistent with what we've found. Companies may focus on what customers are trying to accomplish, but spend woefully too little time making it easy for customers or thinking about how their interactions make customers feel.

Chart of relationship between accessibility and functionality of experiences in the Temkin Experience Ratings

Tips For Delivering The Total Experience

There's no magic formula for CX success. This quote by Colin Powell describes what it takes:

If you are going to achieve excellence in big things, you develop the habit in little matters. Excellence is not an exception, it is a prevailing attitude.

In order for companies to make great CX a "prevailing attitude," they need to master four competencies:

Four customer experience competencies

1. Purposeful Leadership

Temkin Group research consistently shows that the number one obstacle to CX success is "other competing priorities." That issue falls squarely on the shoulders of the executive team. It's very easy to shoot off a few emails and claim that CX is important. But if the executive team doesn't behave like it's important, then why should the rest of the organization?

Example: Mayor Corey Booker Of Newark captured the essence of leadership in this quote: "My mom used to say that who you are speaks so loudly that I can't hear what you say."

2. Employee Engagement

If employees are not aligned with the goals of the company then there's no way they will be able to deliver great experiences for customers. So any CX effort that does not engage employees will likely fail.

Example: The Container Store understands this principle, which is why they make enormous investments in training and supporting their employees. Here's how the company's website described its "We Love Employees Day," which it held on Valentine's Day:

…we all believe that if you work to make your employees the happiest employees around, well then they will absolutely, positively then make our customers the happiest customers around. And if those two are ecstatic, then wonderfully, and almost ironically, you'll have the happiest shareholders around, too.
3. Compelling Brand Values

Brands are more than marketing slogans and advertising campaigns; they represent the organization's raison d'être. We often describe a true brand as "the fabric that aligns all employees with customers in the pursuit of a common cause." So companies need to understand their brand promises and make sure they deliver on them during every interaction with customers.

Example: JetBlue knew that it needed to live up to its "Jetitude" branding by delivering a great experience with its people. So it translated the brand promise into five specific behaviors for its front-line employees:

  • Be in Blue always
  • Be personal
  • Be the answer
  • Be engaging
  • Be thankful to every customer
4. Customer Connectedness

Every time a customer interacts with your company, it leaves an imprint on them, pushing them either towards higher loyalty or further on the path to abandonment. But most companies don't know what effect they are having on customers—never mind what they can do to make improvements. That's why companies need to develop systematic approaches like "voice of the customer" programs for collecting and responding to customer feedback.

Example: Sizzler has gone through a major turnaround over the last couple of years by making sure that it truly understood its customers. Here's how CEO Kerry Kramp describes how the restaurant chain made its improvements:

We kept our finger right on the pulse of the guests' feedback. As they gave us indications of what they liked—either verbally or through the product mix, what were they ordering—we kept adapting our business to the direction that they wanted us to head in.

Closing Thoughts

Companies can't transform into CX leaders overnight. But if they focus on the total experience—functional, accessible, and emotional—and build CX competencies, then they we will be heading in the right direction. And who knows, maybe some of these firms will show up as new leaders in the 2012 Temkin Experience Ratings.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

User Profile

Bruce Temkin, Customer Experience Transformist, is the managing partner of Temkin Group and is widely viewed as a leading expert in how large organizations build differentiation with customer experience. Prior to founding Temkin Group, Bruce spent 12 years at Forrester Research where he led many parts of the research organization and was the most-read analyst in the company for 13 consecutive quarters.

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Comments

16
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Peter: Jordan: I think companies often let themselves off the hook by just comparing themselves to their peers. TV service providers, for instance, could fool themselves into thinking they are okay because they are all bad. Having said that, it is also valuable to look at results in a single industry. That's why I'm writing posts on my blog with the results for each of the 12 industries.

22
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*quantity over quality!

13
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Market today is absolutely in favor of quantity of quality (of both products and experience)

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Interesting that 83% of ratings are either okay, lower. Speaks to the headline: Customers Deserve Better.

That said, I'm not sure how one can compare customer experience across these different business categories. It seems unfair to compare a users CX from a retail store they interact with a couple times a week, to that of a hotel chain they might only interact with a couple times a year.

I'd like to see ratings that compare apples-to-apples. (i.e. the top retailers, or the top hotels, or top banks etc.) Seems like it would be a lot more useful.