Wix has recently introduced Wix ADI (Artificial Design Intelligence) and is rolling out the new product to its global audience.

Wix ADI was designed to eliminate the challenges of building websites. With the data gathered from the experience of their over 86 million users, Wix has blended AI and design sensibility, resulting in easily designed websites. In an interview with Nir Zohar, we explored how Wix has affected the world of web design.

Do you think UX is an important part of Wix success as a Web Building Platform?

Our main focus at Wix has always been to develop the best products to empower our users to build, manage and grow their online presence. Part of developing a great product is having a great UX. Our Wix values "easy" and "stunning" also guide our UX. This is why we are working hard on making every product at Wix both beautiful, as well as easy and as intuitive as possible, so every person in the world will be able to use them successfully.

Do you feel like Wix has killed Web Design?

Absolutely Not. It actually helps Web Design evolve in many ways. This is a technological jump, we are not taking away a designers but just making it more efficient. In the past, if you wanted to hire web designers you had to know flash or dreamweaver, they had to be hard developers. We moved the technical barriers for people who can be amazing web designers. People that used to be known as print designers, can go online and start designing on our very simple platform.

What was the overall Experience that Wix was trying to achieve in the creation of the new platform?

The idea is really that anyone can have a beautiful website, and we set out to help individuals to optimize their resources while creating their brand and their business online.

This is for those individuals that may be time constrained or hesitant about technology or both. Some users just want to press a button and have something that is high quality, robust and great looking. I want to press a button and get something done. While also wanting to make it special at the same time and genuinely reflective of my business. It (Wix ADI) asks you questions about your business and what you are trying to build. It gives you the option to have your website generated for you or you can choose to walk through the process step by step.

It lets you decide how much involvement you want in the development that you want in you site. Then any site can be further edited and customized as your business changes or grows.

What do you think the Future of UX is?

Design Matters. Through the internet you have the ability to try and experience things to see what is working and what is not. I think that if you look at the big successes in UX, I think that it is an amazing combination of getting what they need to get done but also creating a user atmosphere. I think that we are at the beginning. There is a key understanding that design matters. If you want to build an amazing product it needs to work properly while looking great. This is where Wix leads with the pairing of design and technology. We have done it in the past when we were the first flash editor and then we were the first HTML file editor and now this is the first time ever it has been done with AI.

Is Wix assisting in creating a Story of Web Design?

We do more than help you build a website but we help you build a brand and a business. We help you operate your business. We are changing the lives of small brands by empowering their online presence. With an amazing website you can start managing the relationship of your company. Big brands spend hundreds of thousands of dollars or even more to do so and we bring this capability to everyone. We believe that Wix is best place for designers, creative, individuals and SMBs to get their brands online.

You refer to your new platform as AI. Can you expand on that a little more?

Artificial Intelligence commonly means a computer system that is able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. There are many examples from cars that can make decisions about how to drive correctly, to search engines determining which results will be most relevant for your query.

At Wix, we always focus on solutions that are both "easy" and "stunning" and this is why we decided to create Wix ADI - Artificial Design Intelligence, which makes aesthetic decisions like a human designer. We believe that Wix is the best platform for creatives, individuals, and small businesses and we wanted to make this fast and easy without compromising look and feel.

Wix ADI knows what is beautiful and what is not, which layout works best with which content, and can choose optimal fonts and colors to represent a brand or business.

Wix ADI results focus on making sure your site is stunning, no matter what kind of content you enter. It knows how to adapt automatically to your selections, in the most transparent and intuitive way possible. It's basically doing the thinking for you when it comes to design. You just need to focus on your unique content and it does the rest.

In order to create Wix ADI, we use the data that we have from our more than 88 million websites, and decade of data, and created a "website designer brain” and like humans, as it gets more data, and more insights, it can also make smarter decisions, and continue to evolve and advance its design skills.

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I went to several colleges and received 2 degrees related to design and visual communications and of all that schooling I had only one teacher who truly pushed for hard reviews with constructive criticism. The most relaxed reviews I ever received were in getting a B.A. in Studio Art. We were given the chance to critique one another and about the most constructive thing anyone said was “that’s great… I love it.” It wasn’t that we couldn’t critique each other, but often other people just didn’t want to.I always missed that one teacher who let us, and made us, go at one another for our design flaws. I’ve been in the workforce now for 3 years and one of my favorite things to do still is to deconstruct a design and make it better.More helpful would be to dig deeper and look at more specific principles, such as Principles of Design and Jakob Nielsen’s Usability Heuristics. With these, we could begin to dissect a Web design into its component parts and critique each individually. But let’s be realistic: not many will take the time to do that. Even more people just turn to companies such as : Bluecadet ( http://bluecadet.com ), Clever Solution Inc ( https://clever-solution.com/De… ) and others.Learning the principles of usability, user interface, typography, visual design and so on is something every Web designer should work towards. This understanding will give you some of the language and criteria you need to effectively criticize. The rest is effort.To this end, I’ve formulated some simple rules for judging a Web design:1. NOTE YOUR GUT REACTION, BUT TAKE TIME TO EXPLORE IT.2. LEARN TO ARTICULATE YOUR OBSERVATIONS, AND INVITE BEING QUESTIONED.3. BE SPECIFIC, AND OFFER SUGGESTIONS IF APPROPRIATE.4. ALWAYS CONSIDER CONTEXT AND AUDIENCE-APPROPRIATENESS.5. THE MOST IMPORTANT MEASURE OF A UI’S SUCCESS IS HOW WELL IT MEETS EXPECTATIONS.6. SUBJECTIVITY IS FINE IF LABELED AS SUCH AND ARTICULATED PROPERLY.7. DON’T NEGLECT THE CONTENT.8. STUDY THE PRINCIPLES USED TO JUDGE DESIGN, AND LEARN THE LANGUAGE.

I went to several colleges and received 2 degrees related to design and visual communications and of all that schooling I had only one teacher who truly pushed for hard reviews with constructive criticism. The most relaxed reviews I ever received were in getting a B.A. in Studio Art. We were given the chance to critique one another and about the most constructive thing anyone said was “that’s great… I love it.” It wasn’t that we couldn’t critique each other, but often other people just didn’t want to.I always missed that one teacher who let us, and made us, go at one another for our design flaws. I’ve been in the workforce now for 3 years and one of my favorite things to do still is to deconstruct a design and make it better.More helpful would be to dig deeper and look at more specific principles, such as Principles of Design and Jakob Nielsen’s Usability Heuristics. With these, we could begin to dissect a Web design into its component parts and critique each individually. But let’s be realistic: not many will take the time to do that. Even more people just turn to companies such as : Bluecadet ( http://bluecadet.com ), Clever Solution Inc ( https://clever-solution.com/De… ) and others.Learning the principles of usability, user interface, typography, visual design and so on is something every Web designer should work towards. This understanding will give you some of the language and criteria you need to effectively criticize. The rest is effort.To this end, I’ve formulated some simple rules for judging a Web design:1. NOTE YOUR GUT REACTION, BUT TAKE TIME TO EXPLORE IT.2. LEARN TO ARTICULATE YOUR OBSERVATIONS, AND INVITE BEING QUESTIONED.3. BE SPECIFIC, AND OFFER SUGGESTIONS IF APPROPRIATE.4. ALWAYS CONSIDER CONTEXT AND AUDIENCE-APPROPRIATENESS.5. THE MOST IMPORTANT MEASURE OF A UI’S SUCCESS IS HOW WELL IT MEETS EXPECTATIONS.6. SUBJECTIVITY IS FINE IF LABELED AS SUCH AND ARTICULATED PROPERLY.7. DON’T NEGLECT THE CONTENT.8. STUDY THE PRINCIPLES USED TO JUDGE DESIGN, AND LEARN THE LANGUAGE.

This sounded like an interesting article to read based on the title.  I did read it.  But once I saw that it was an interview with the CEO of Wix, I thought, "Conflict of interest much?"  Of course it's in his interest to get the people whose profession he is interested in killing on board with his product!  It just adds fuel to the fire.

But a couple things I don't think Wix (or ADI) can replace: having actual illustration skills (the domain of the graphic designer) or having the user research / UX foresight to know how to solve the right problem for the right users.  I don't believe either of these things can be automated away.  Every site and every client's business needs to be treated differently here.

One thing I do like is the WordPress themes that are essentially just layout builders.  They offer a lot of flexibility, where you only code essentially for custom styling.  And from a former software engineer's perspective, they get rid of nearly all of the testing time associated with testing things like contact forms that have already been built by other people.  That allows me to concentrate on UX for the clients who need me to be a one-stop shop, while also avoiding spending weeks on end debugging.

I agree with him. Wix is a cool tool if you know how to use it!

About 1/2 of my first-time freelance clients waste a couple of weeks goofing around with "tools" like Wix. They always seem to come to the same conclusion: You need a human to design and develop a working, intuitive website that will do exactly what you want.

There are still a few of us out there that know how to code from scratch, too. I can do anything that jquery, bootstrap, etc., etc., can do, with a fraction of the code. The end result is a page that renders faster, on all devices, and looks GREAT.

I've been doing web design and development since 1998.  A LOT of my work is on Fortune 500 company websites, and a lot of my work is in vertical markets such as dentistry, or law. There aren't a lot of us left, it seems, that don't rely on WYSIWYG so called 'tools.'

It hasn't killed web design. It's killed web designers.