UX Magazine

Defining and Informing the Complex Field of User Experience (UX)
Article No. 32 February 15, 2006

Get Ready For Retro Marketing

It’s what the customer wants that counts, follow your gut first, markets are conversations, customers don’t know what they really want, it’s about telling stories, be your own client, etc, etc…

If I grabbed 10 books off of my shelf I could find researched theses on each of the concepts listed above and many more.

At some point, everything old is new again.

I find myself wondering if the “new era” of marketing is quickly becoming the cluttered noise that it is hoping to rise above. The latest fad based on a few case-studies where a different approach proved successful.

It reminds me of similar cycles in food and fashion: carbs are good, carbs are bad, protein only, protein only is bad or ties are wide, ties are narrow, no ties, ties are back, etc…

Is marketing evolving or is it merely moving in a fad like cycle in the same way diets and fashions move in and out of style?

Fad Marketing = Fad Diets = Fashion Trends

Advertising is not as dead as some would think, word of mouth is not the singular answer and blogs are not the only way to go forward.

For all the new ideas being presented in order to find the front edge of the envelope, it is worth noting that the timeless wisdom of the likes of Peter Drucker, Napoleon Hill and Nelson Rockefeller remain highly effective. Follow the teachings of any of these authors today and you will still find success.

As companies accelerate to embrace all these New Marketing ideas, the classics become more surprising, more novel and more effective.

At some point, everything old is new again. Simple beats complicated. Comfort beats confusion.

Retro Marketing is just around the corner…

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

User Profile

Howard Mann is the founder of Brickyard Partners, a business strategy agency based in Portland, OR. Prior to founding Brickyard Partners in 2001, Mann owned a premier international logistics company with over 140 Million in revenue, six U.S. offices and a global network of over 40 agents worldwide.

As that business came under severe pressure from the previous economic downturn and industry consolidation, Howard lead the company out from those treacherous times by returning to the basics that make every business great and completing 6 acquisitions that re-imagined the business so it was highly attractive to buyers. Finding that “secret sauce” did not come easily but has fueled his purpose to help other business leaders to never have to go through what he endured. 

Through real world experience and those hard times in the “trenches” of business he has learned that it is not following the latest fad, copying competitors or adding complexity that makes a business truly great. His pragmatic approach and knowing what it feels like to sit in the CEO/Owner chair is what makes his work so different and effective.

In addition to his strategy, marketing and communications work, Mann coaches a select group of entrepreneurs, CEO's and business owners. His highly focused workshops and keynotes help executive teams take aggressive action to unlock the true potential of their organizations and build remarkable businesses that endure. In good times and bad. Online and off.

Howard is a sought after speaker both in the U.S. and around the world. He writes frequently on his blog about the importance of the basics and reconnecting to the passion that too often gets lost as businesses mature.

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Comments

50
45

Thank you…

As everyone tries to “brand” themselves, their clients, and their “patented” approach, your article reminds us that the fundamentals will never change. True success is earned, not bought and faking it can only take you so far before someone asks for a tour of the empty attic you keep between your shoulders.

Old school is the new new school.

54
52

It’s just a way or another try to get more attention than others between the whole commercials, isn’t it? And if so, Cody, you ‘re right: Fundamentals will never change – the try to be the most famous.

So for mistakes. I’m just a german ;-)

44
46

I don’t think it’s as simple as “new school” versus “old school.” There is no one path to business or marketing success.

As times and technologies change, so do business and advertising practices. That doesn’t necessarily make the old methods obsolete, however, nor does it make the new methods mere fads.

43
43

I don’t think it’s as simple as “new school” versus “old school.” There is no one path to business or marketing success.

As times and technologies change, so do business and advertising practices. That doesn’t necessarily make the old methods obsolete, however, nor does it make the new methods mere fads.

46
45

It’s just a way or another try to get more attention than others between the whole commercials, isn’t it? And if so, Cody, you ‘re right: Fundamentals will never change – the try to be the most famous.

So for mistakes. I’m just a german ;-)

47
44

Thank you…

As everyone tries to “brand” themselves, their clients, and their “patented” approach, your article reminds us that the fundamentals will never change. True success is earned, not bought and faking it can only take you so far before someone asks for a tour of the empty attic you keep between your shoulders.

Old school is the new new school.